Paul Harvey- Selected Publications#

  • Harvey, P.H., Birley, N. and Blackstock, T.H. (1975) The effect of experience on the selective behaviour of song thrushes feeding on artificial populations of Cepaea (Held.). Genetica 45, 211-216. Cepaea is a much researched snail because it is visually polymorphic for shell pattem in virtually all populations studied. The only explanation for the universality of that polymorphism is frequency dependent selection. This is the first experimental test to show that natural predators select appropriately.
  • Clutton-Brock, T.H. and Harvey, P.H. (1977) Primate ecology and social organisation. JT Zool. (Lond). 183, 1-39. Citation Classic The first comprehensive and statistical comparative paper for any taxonomic group. Also the first to make clear that species were not independent points for statistical analysis.
  • Greenwood, PJ., Harvey, P.H. and Perrins, C.M. (1978) Inbreeding and dispersal in the great tit. Nature 271, 52-54. The first time that sex biased dispersal was related to inbreeding avoidance, and the first demonstration of inbreeding depression in a natural population.
  • Gittleman, .J.L. and Harvey, P.H. (1980) Why are distasteful prey not cryptic? Nature 286, 149-150. The first experimental test of Harvey’s previously-published idea that aposematic coloration evolved through kin selection. Fisher had suggested this for distastefulness but not bright coloration.
  • Harvey, P.H., Clutton-Brock, T.H. and Mace, G.M. (1980) Brain size and ecology in small mammals and primates. Proc. Natl. Acaal Sci. U.S.A. 77, 4387-4389. The first paper relating brain size variation to identified selective forces in the environment common to both small mammals and primates.
  • Harvey, P.H. and Mace, G.M. (1982) Comparisons between taxa and adaptive trends: problems of methodology. ln Current Problems in Sociobiology. pp. 343-361. King‘s College Sociobiology Group (ed.), Cambridge University Press. The first paper to lay out the statistical problems with phylogenetic non·independence, and provide some solutions.
  • Harvey, P.H., Colwell, R.K., Silvertown, J.W. and May, R.M. (1983) Null models in ecology. Ann. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 14, 189-211. Although classed as a review, this was the paper that defined the structure of the different sorts of statistical null model in ecology.
  • Harvey, P.H. and Harcourt, A.H. (1984) Sperm competition, testes size and breeding systems in primates. in Sperm Competition and the Evolution of Animal Mating Systems. pp. 589-600. Smith, R.L. (ed.). Academic Press. Following an earlier Nature paper, this shows how relative testes, body and canine size can be used to predict details of` breeding systems among primates.
  • Harvey, P.H. and Zammuto, R.M, (1985) Patterns of mortality and age at first reproduction in natural populations of mammals. Nature 315, 319-320. The first of many comparative studies to reveal the fast-slow axis independent of body size.
  • Harvey, P.H. and Godfray, 1·l.C.J. (1987) How species divide resources. Amer. Nat.129, 318-320. Bringing body size variation into resource allocation descriptors, such as relative species abundance, for the first time
  • Bennett, P.M. and Harvey, P.H. (1988) How fecundity balances mortality in birds.Nature 333, 216. The first description of the components of fecundity that balance differences in mortality among birds.
  • Read, A.F. and Harvey, P.H. (1989) Life history differences among the eutherian radiations. J Zoo!. 219, 329-353. Comparative life history descriptions and explanations across all mammals for the first time.
  • Nee, S., Read, A.F., Greenwood, J.J.D. and Harvey, P.H. (1991) The relationship between abundance and body size in British birds. Nature 351, 312-313. The first description ofthe relationship in a full island community, revealing unexpected patterns.
  • Harvey, P.1—l. and Purvis, A. (1991) Comparative methods for explaining adaptations Nature 351, 619-624. Revealing how the commonly-utilised assumptions of different evolutionary models can lead to very different conclusions from comparative tests.
  • Garland, T., Harvey, P.1~1. and Ives, A.R. (1992) Procedures for the analysis of comparative data using independent contrasts. Syst. Zool. 41, 18-32 Developing new and now-standard statistical tests for determining appropriate transformations of data for comparative tests.
  • Harvey, P.H., May, R.M. and Nee, S. (1994) Phylogenies without fossils. Evolution 48, 523-529. Molecular phylogenies based on contemporary species can be analysed to reveal speciation and extinction rates, mass exinctions, radiations, and other unexpected evolutionary processes.
  • Holmes, E.C., Nee, S., Rambaut, A., Garnett, G.P. and Harvey, P.H. (1995) Revealing the history of infectious disease epidemics through phylogenetic trees. Phil.Trans. Roy. Soc, (Lond) B 349, 33-40. Showing how genome comparisons from small samples of contemporary viruses can reveal epidemic history.
  • Bromham, L., Rambaut, A. and Harvey, P.l-1. (1996) Determinants of rate variation in mammalian DNA sequence evolution. J Mol. Evol. 43, 610-621 Showing when and why molecular clocks change their rates in mammals.
  • Harvey, P.H. (1996) Phylogenies for ecologists: the 1995 Tansley Lecture, J Anim. Ecol. 65, 255-263. Why comparative ecological studies need to use phylogenetic data,and how to do it.
  • Harvey, P.H. and Rambaut, A. (1998) Phylogenetic extinction rates and comparative methodology. Proc. R. Soc. Lond B. 265, 1691-1696. Showing for the first time how extinction rate differences can compromise comparative tests.
  • Pybus, O.G., Rambaut, A. and Harvey, P.H. (2000) An integrated framework for the inference of viral population history from reconstructed genealogies. Genetics 155,1429-1437. New and now widely used methods for inferring epidemic history from sequence data of contemporary viruses.
  • Barton R.A. and Harvey, P.H. (2000) Mosaic evolution of brain structure in mammals. Nature 405, 1055-1058. The first quantitative statistical analysis of variation in the size of mammalian brain components to reveal mosaic evolution.
  • Pybus, 0.G., Charleston, M.A., Gupta, S., Rambaut. A., Holmes, E.C. and Harvey, P.H. (2001) The epidemic behaviour of the hepatitis C virus. Science 292, 2323-2325. Estimating RO from viral sequence sequence data for the first time, thereby linking phylogenetic studies to formal epidemiological models.
  • Pybus, O.G., Rambaut, A., Holmes, E.C. and Harvey, P.H (2002) New inferences form Tree Shape: Numbers of Missing Taxa and Population Growth Rates. Syst. Biol.51, 881-888. Bringing tree balance into the analysis of population growth rates from contemporary data, thereby revealing differences between lineages.
  • Freckleton, R.P., Pagel, M. and Harvey, PH (2003) Comparative methods for adaptive radiations. Symp. Brit. Ecol. Soc. 43, 391-407. Harvey and Andrew Rambauthad shoym that niche-based evolution does not accord statistically with Brownian assumptions. Here that theme is developed significantly to look at families of niche-based models and reveal their statistical properties.
  • Freckleton, R.P. and Harvey, P.H. (2006) Detecting non-Brownian trait evolution in adaptive radiations. PLOS (Biology). The provision and implementation of a powerful test for detecting non-Brownian evolution from comparative and phylogenetic data. A case study reveals niche-based non-Brownian evolution that would not have been detected previously.


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